World Stories

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ejjus
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World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sat Apr 08, 2017 1:48 am

Obični ljudi u izvanrednim situacijama. Izvanredni ljudi u običnim situacijama. Sve to kroz prizmu novinarstva. U ovoj temi ostavljajte članke o ljudima širom svijeta. Bez tematskog ograničenja. Može biti o bilo čemu, bilo gdje. Po potrebi možete i diskutovat o njima.

THE DESPERATE BATTLE TO DESTROY ISIS
A swat team of Iraqis, all of whom have suffered at the hands of terrorists, join the fight to retake Mosul—and plan to exact revenge.
By Luke Mogelson

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/ ... stroy-isis

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"I remembered a story that Hussein, a shy and affable man in his early twenties, had told me. After his first girlfriend, Dunya, broke up with him, he’d had her portrait tattooed on his arm. “For revenge,” Hussein had said, rolling up his sleeve and revealing an elaborately detailed image. Recently, though, he’d begun saving money for a new tattoo, to cover Dunya’s portrait. He’d fallen in love with the daughter of an Army colonel, in Baghdad, and they were engaged.

When Hussein was shot, his older brother, Marwan, was down on the street, with Rayyan and the rest of the team. Marwan ran toward the house and was shot himself. Marwan survived his wounds. Hussein did not.

Souhel said that, after Hussein died, the swat team bombarded the house relentlessly until two in the morning, killing all three militants inside. Then the policemen chained the corpses to the backs of their Humvees and dragged them through the streets of Aden.
"
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sat Apr 08, 2017 1:58 am

THE MAN ON THE OPERATING TABLE
Baynazar Mohammad Nazar was a husband and a father of four — and a patient killed during the attack on the MSF hospital in Kunduz. This is his story.
PHOTOGRAPHS AND STORY BY ANDREW QUILTY

NSFW http://foreignpolicy.com/2015/12/03/the ... airstrike/

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"Moments after Baynazar and Samad turned to go back, gunfire erupted. Samad ran, ducking down beside a compound wall. He looked for Baynazar and saw him a few yards away, still out in the open, and watched his friend crumple to the ground.

The fighting died down quickly, allowing Samad to get to Baynazar. He’d been struck by a bullet in the thigh, and the wound was bleeding badly. With the help of a few Taliban fighters, Samad loaded Baynazar onto the back of a passing Zarang — a three-wheeled motorbike with a small flatbed — and the driver rushed the two men to the nearby MSF hospital.

Baynazar had already gone into surgery by the time Najibah arrived at the center with Khalid around noon. (Baynazar had been able to reach Samiullah, their eldest son, a tall, thin boy of 19, who then relayed the news to his mother.) He was sitting in his hospital bed, the cage-like metal and screws of an external-fixation bracket holding together the bone where the bullet had broken it apart. She stayed by his side for the rest of the afternoon; teary-eyed, she scolded him for going to the bazaar.

“Don’t cry,” Baynazar said, comforting his wife. “It’s just bad luck.” The doctors had scheduled his second surgery for the following day, and soon after he would be able to come home.
"
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sun Apr 09, 2017 1:33 pm

The women of China’s workforce
By Aly Song

http://blogs.reuters.com/photographers- ... workforce/

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"As a follow-up to China’s mighty urbanization policy, I gained access to a huge construction site within a new residential development zone some 30 kilometers (18 miles) from Shanghai’s city center. My original plan was to photograph the lives of Chinese migrant workers at night. I imagined that they would probably go to some colorful places and do some interesting things after nightfall. But I was completely wrong – every day they went straight back to their dormitories, where they would eat, chat, play some poker, probably watch an outdoor movie once a month, and that’s it!"
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:33 am

FUKUSHIMA: ONE MAN’S STORY
The tale of a single survivor from the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown
BY HENRY TRICKS

https://www.1843magazine.com/content/fe ... /fukushima

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"Morihisa Kanouya, then 71, had long reaped the benefits of the safety of those waves. A second-generation fisherman, he was often among the first five in the New Year’s parade because of the size of his catches. His working life was as regular as the movement of the tides. He would rise at 2am, six days a week, at his home close to the sea. Hisako, his cheery wife, would get up with him, handing him a small bento box that she had prepared before going to bed, with a snack that he would eat in the chilly darkness out at sea. He would set out with only his eldest son for company. In a few hours they would haul in anything from 50-200kg of fish, including flounder, octopus, sea bream and squid. By 7am, they would be back home in time for Hisako’s breakfast. Then from 9am, Kanouya-san (as everyone knows him) would unload his catch at the wholesale market, from where it would be trucked to Tsukiji, one of the world’s biggest fish markets, in Tokyo. By the early afternoon, he would have scrubbed his nets, and a bit later he would be tucking into his first glass of sake. A strapping, broad-chested man, he can still put away a few litres a day, he reckons. But by 8pm, he was usually home and in bed."
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:13 am

Sir Philip Gibbs (May 1, 1877 – March 10, 1962) je bio engleski novinar koji je služio kao jedan od pet zvaničnih Britanskih korespondenata tokom prvog svjetskog rata. Now It Can Be Told, izdata 1920te godine, je knjiga u kojoj opisuje dešavanja na zapadnom frontu bez cenzure koja je bila na snazi tokom godina ratovanja.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3317/331 ... nk2HCH0006

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"In this book I have written about some aspects of the war which, I believe, the world must know and remember, not only as a memorial of men’s courage in tragic years, but as a warning of what will happen again—surely—if a heritage of evil and of folly is not cut out of the hearts of peoples. Here it is the reality of modern warfare not only as it appears to British soldiers, of whom I can tell, but to soldiers on all the fronts where conditions were the same.
What I have written here does not cancel, nor alter, nor deny anything in my daily narratives of events on the western front as they are now published in book form. They stand, I may claim sincerely and humbly, as a truthful, accurate, and tragic record of the battles in France and Belgium during the years of war, broadly pictured out as far as I could see and know. My duty, then, was that of a chronicler, not arguing why things should have happened so nor giving reasons why they should not happen so, but describing faithfully many of the things I saw, and narrating the facts as I found them, as far as the censorship would allow. After early, hostile days it allowed nearly all but criticism, protest, and of the figures of loss.
The purpose of this book is to get deeper into the truth of this war and of all war—not by a more detailed narrative of events, but rather as the truth was revealed to the minds of men, in many aspects, out of their experience; and by a plain statement of realities, however painful, to add something to the world’s knowledge out of which men of good-will may try to shape some new system of relationship between one people and another, some new code of international morality, preventing or at least postponing another massacre of youth like that five years’ sacrifice of boys of which I was a witness
."
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:10 pm

Riding the rails to Russia with the migrant workers of Central Asia.
BY JOSEPH SCHOTTENFELD
ILLUSTRATIONS BY GEORGE BUTLER

http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/08/10/the ... migration/

Image

The search began before dawn; the train had just crossed the border of Tajikistan into Uzbekistan. We were only three hours into the four-day train ride between Dushanbe, Tajikistan’s capital, and Moscow.

An Uzbek border guard, clad in brown fatigues, boarded the train — a Soviet-replica, green, with a silver roof — and began yelling. He moved through the car, searching passenger after passenger, ripping apart belongings, interrogating everyone about terrorism and narcotics, and scanning flip phones and cheap Nokias for “sex photos” (pornography is banned in Uzbekistan). The passengers endured this, unfazed. Almost all of them were migrants traveling to Russia for work. They’d seen this routine before.

It was March. Across Tajikistan, thousands of people — mostly young men — were departing for or preparing to leave for Russia. The long Russian winter was nearing its end; construction projects in cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg were slowly coming back to life.
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

kmirsad
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Re: World Stories

Post by kmirsad » Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:03 pm

:-D :-D :-D

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Fri Oct 06, 2017 9:16 pm

EUROPE SLAMS ITS GATES
IMPERILING AFRICA — AND ITS OWN SOUL


A FOREIGN POLICY SPECIAL INVESTIGATION

BY TY MCCORMICK | PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLE SOBECKI

Image

Abdoulaye Traoré stands in the doorway of his uncle’s house in Bamako. Traoré wasn’t sure he could afford to attend law school in the capital, but his uncle agreed to pay the $2.90 in monthly rent for a single room Traoré now shares with two other young men.

http://europeslamsitsgates.foreignpolic ... o-0--intro

An unprecedented wave of African migration is warping Europe’s politics and threatening its stability. Can the Continent respond without destroying its values and wreaking havoc in Africa? FP’s special investigation examines Europe’s desperate campaign to barricade itself — and the policies’ unintended consequences.

OCT. 4, 2017

In 2015, a record 1.3 million people applied for asylum in Europe — nearly double the previous high, set in 1992 (the year after the Soviet Union collapsed). The arrivals predominantly hailed from the war zones of Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Most came through Turkey, rode dinghies across the Aegean Sea to Greece, and then traveled, in vast human caravans, through the Balkans into Hungary, Austria, and Germany. They carried little more than a suitcase or two, some clothes, a bit of cash, and the hope for refuge and a better life.


Some European countries welcomed the arrivals with open arms; others closed their borders and left them to languish. But even the most generous hosts — Germany admitted 1.1 million refugees and migrants in 2015 — soon hit their limits: As social welfare networks were stretched thin and nativist fears of terrorism and Islamization grew, anti-immigrant political parties began to gain sway. The populist surge led many centrist leaders to reconsider their erstwhile openness, lest the rising right-wing backlash threaten the entire European project.

And so, in early 2016, the European Union reached a deal with Turkey, offering up to $6.6 billion (and the promise of visa-free travel to the EU for Turkish citizens) in exchange for Ankara’s help in blocking the departures. The plan worked. From 2015 to 2016, the number of people crossing the Aegean to Greece dropped by nearly 80 percent.

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Above: Refugees wait to get on board an NGO-operated vessel after being rescued from a wooden boat sailing on the Mediterranean Sea near Libya on June 15. (Marcus Drinkwater/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images); Previous: Detainees from West Africa peer out of their over-crowded cell in the al-Nasr detention center in Zawiya, Libya, where migrants intercepted by the Coast Guard in Zawiya are warehoused indefinitely. (Photo by Peter Tinti)

But Europe’s migration crisis wasn’t over.

With one sea route closed, another — from North Africa across the Mediterranean Sea to Italy — quickly expanded, with a record 181,000 people taking it last year. And that number is sure to keep growing: Sub-Saharan Africa currently has one of the highest birthrates in the world, and, according to one recent study, almost 800 million working-age people there — more than the current population of Europe — will enter the labor force between now and 2050. Few of them will find decent jobs; many won’t find work at all.

Alarmed by such numbers, Europe’s leaders are scrambling to respond. So far, their new policies have focused not just on securing the Continent’s borders but on tackling the problem at its source. Along with tough new immigration policies, Europe has launched a slew of development and state-building efforts in countries including Senegal and Somalia.

But lofty ideals are being betrayed by flawed implementation. At least one ill-conceived European-backed development project has already gone bust, while efforts to train and equip local security forces and militias have empowered gunmen known to torture, enslave, and kill civilians. Intentionally or not, European taxpayers are now funding a massive deterrence and interdiction effort that is largely invisible in Europe but profoundly damaging to Africa. It’s also futile: Despite the billions of dollars being spent, the current efforts won’t resolve the causes of Africa’s exodus or stop its flow.

Part I of our series begins in Mali, where failed efforts to kick-start the economy are having the opposite of their intended effect, sending even more people streaming north. Part II takes readers along Niger’s lawless smuggling routes, where the military’s efforts to block departures have elevated the body count. In Part III, our reporter tours Libya’s new detention-industrial complex, where would-be migrants are enslaved and ransomed by European-backed militias. Part IV tells the story of one man who fled Senegal for Italy, only to be caught and — like so many others — sent back home to a life of humiliation and poverty. And Part V explores how European leaders are navigating the moral and political consequences of their own decisions.

Those leaders may not know it yet, but Africans won’t be the only ones to suffer. The increasingly desperate measures to barricade its borders may also end up costing Europe its soul.
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sat Oct 14, 2017 7:56 pm

EUROPE SLAMS ITS GATES
PART II


Highway Through Hell
The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

BY TY MCCORMICK | PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLE SOBECKI

OCT. 4, 2017

“We know that many people are dying in the Mediterranean. But many are dying in the desert as well, and we have not many statistics.”
Increasingly raided by the authorities, who arrest the smugglers and turn the migrants over to IOM, the ghettos are getting smaller, and they are constantly being moved so they won’t be discovered. Gaining access to the one where Sonko was living took days of negotiation because the smugglers feared I would be followed or would otherwise inadvertently reveal its location. The day I visited the half-finished compound in a largely abandoned neighborhood on the farthest margins of the city, just four other migrants besides Sonko were there — two from Cameroon and two from Guinea. A group of 29 West Africans had departed for Libya the night before. The structure itself was crumbling and covered with a thick dusting of sand. The dirt floors were bare except for a few empty water bottles, plastic bags, and a broken sandal — the detritus of an unknown number of previous inhabitants. On the walls, migrants had scribbled phone numbers, presumably of family members, drivers, and coxeurs. In one corner, someone had left a message in block letters: “The road of success never smooth.”

Mali update.
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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ejjus
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Re: World Stories

Post by ejjus » Sat Oct 21, 2017 5:31 pm

FLEEING ANGER IN AMERICA, JAMES BALDWIN FOUND SOLACE IN 1960s TURKEY

By Kareem Fahim February 27

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American writer James Baldwin in Istanbul. (Sedat Pakay)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/mi ... 8ff5ac7914

ISTANBUL — There is no trace of James Baldwin in the four-story building where he lived for a time, decades ago, on Ebe Hanim street, and where the mention of his name now draws blank stares. The bar where Baldwin drank up the hill from the apartment has vanished, too, lost in the garish renovation of the old Park Hotel.

A plaque in the lobby mentions the hotel’s most notable visitors, including Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder of the Turkish republic, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. But not Baldwin, who was reaching the height of his international fame when he lived in Turkey but was hardly bothered as he walked the streets of 1960s Istanbul: a star, to be sure, but mostly among a small firmament of dear collaborators and friends.

A new Oscar-nominated documentary by the Haitian director Raoul Peck has tapped into a broader American revival of interest in Baldwin, whose fiction, essays and speeches have taken on added relevance in the era of Black Lives Matter and the fervent debates in the United States over race and identity, diversity and police brutality.

But Baldwin made an impression in Turkey, too, where he lived off and on for a decade or so, beginning in 1961 — though his footprints, these days, can be hard to find. His overlooked sojourn was a period of prodigious creative production and collaboration with Turkish artists, in a place he came to regard as a sanctuary — despite Turkey’s own political turbulence — from the racism, homophobia and scarring civil rights struggle back home.

He could no longer work in the United States, he told his friend, the drama critic Zeynep Oral. “I can’t breathe,” she quoted him as saying. “I have to look from outside.”
The world is deep,:
And deeper than even day may dream.

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